War of the Rebellion: Serial 077 Page 0516 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter LI.

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miles from that place in strong force. This fact I reported to Major-General Thomas and requested re-enforcements of 1,000 or 1,500 men, believing the enemy intended coming down on my line of road. At 3 o'clock I sent Colonel Chapman, with 200 men of Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry, up the road toward Larkinsville, on a train that I had prepared, strengthened with three-inch oak plank, for the purpose of scouting the road. He found the enemy on the road, about five miles out, and drove them off. About 4 p. m. another force of the enemy attacked our pickets on the Pulaski road, and soon after a flag of truce was sent in by Brigadier General A. Buford, with the following communication, addressed to Colonel G. M. L. Johnson, commanding post:

NEAR HUNTSVILLE, ALA., September 30, 1864.

Colonel JohnSON,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Huntsville, Ala.:

COLONEL: I am here in command of the advance of General Forrest's army, with instructions to demand the surrender of the city, the fort, and garrison. An answer to this demand must be made before night-fall. If refused, the citizens must leave at once. Certain conditions will attend the surrender, which conditions Colonel Kelley, the bearer, will acquaint you with.

I am, colonel, very respectfully,

A. BUFORD,

Brigadier-General, Provisional Army, C. S., Commanding.

To which I returned the following answer:

HUNTSVILLE, September 30, 1864.

Brigadier General A. BUFORD,

Commanding Confederate Forces, near Huntsville:

GENERAL: General Granger directs me to say that he has assumed command of the forces in this city. He also directs me to say that he will not surrender the fort or city on any terms. You can come and take it as soon as you get ready. The inhabitants of this city are mostly citizens of the Southern Confederacy. He would suppose you would give them more than a couple of hours to leave. You can, of course, in this act your own pleasure.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAM. M. KNEELAND,

First Lieutenant, Eighteenth Michigan Infantry, Act. Asst. Adjt. General

About two hours later I sent the following proposition to General Buford, commanding Confederate forces:

HUNTSVILLE, September 30, 1864.

Brigadier General A. BUFORD,

Commanding Confederate Forces, near Huntsville:

GENERAL: General Granger directs me to say that for the sake of humanity he makes the following propositions: If you will pledge yourself that your forces shall not occupy any portion of the city, he will not occupy it, except that part which is in the immediate vicinity of the fort and essential to its defense. If you will attack the city from the south side, he will withdraw all his forces to the fort and meet you there. Or if you will designate some portion of the city which shall be held sacred the citizens will be removed there and the general will not occupy it with his troops. These propositions are made solely to give protection to defenseless citizens.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAM. M. KNEELAND,

First Lieutenant, Eighteenth Michigan Infantry, Act. Asst. Adjt. General

To these propositions Major-General Forrest replied in the following communication:

HEADQUARTERS FORREST'S CAVALRY,

In the Field, near Huntsville, Ala., September 30, 1864.

Brigadier-General GRANGER,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Huntsville, Ala.:

GENERAL: Your communication addressed to Brigadier-General Buford, concerning the positions to be assumed by the two belligerent parties, has this moment been referred to me. I respectfully decline acceding to them. I except to attack