War of the Rebellion: Serial 077 Page 0404 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter LI.

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moving eastward and toward the Mississippi, above the mouth of Red River. The transfer of General A. J. Smith's command to Sherman's front makes it advisable that any troops that can be spared from the main operations should be concentrated at Memphis, with the view of supporting the line of the Arkansas, as I cannot now safely draw any considerable force from General Washburn's command.

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK, Chief of Staff.

NEW ORLEANS, LA., August 24, 1864.

(Via New York September 1. Received 8. 20 a. m.)

Fort Morgan surrendered unconditionally at 2 p. m. yesterday, 23rd instant.

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK, Chief of Staff.

NEW ORLEANS, LA., August 24, 1864.

(Via New York September 1. Received 8. 20 a. m.)

By the surrender of Fort Morgan we have about 600 prisoners, 60 pieces of artillery, and a large quantity of material. In the twelve hours preceding the surrender about 3,000 shells were thrown into the fort. The citadel and barracks are entirely destroyed and the works generally much injured. Many of the guns were spiked, and carriages burned, and much of the ammunition destroyed by the rebels. The losses in the army were 1 man killed and 7 wounded.

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK, Chief of Staff.

ADDENDA.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE WEST MISSISSIPPI,

New Orleans, La., August 6, 1864.

Admiral D. G. FARRAGUT,

Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, off Mobile, Ala.:

DEAR ADMIRAL: Permit me to congratulate you upon the brilliant results of your operations of yesterday, the success of which no one doubted, but which we all feared would be attended with much greater losses than you have sustained. This army will always rejoice in your successes, and sympathize with your and the officers and men of your squadron in your sorrows for the loss of your gallant comrades. I will send to General Granger at once all the available force, about 2,000 men, that I have here, and will add to it any that I can gather from points above. Permit me to add the expression of my regret that I have not at present the means of co-operation that would give the most perfect results of your glorious operations.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General, Commanding.