War of the Rebellion: Serial 077 Page 0228 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter LI.

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Collars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Valise saddles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Artillery saddles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Wheel traces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Lead traces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Breast straps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Sets breeching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Limber chests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Respectfully submitted.

J. B. RUSSELL,

Chief Ordnance Officer.

ADDENDA

HEADQUARTERS FORREST'S CAVALRY,

Tupelo, Miss., June 28, 1864.

SOLDIERS: After a long and laborious campaign, the major-general commanding deems it an appropriate occasion to address you a few words of recapitulation, acknowledgment, and congratulation. About the 15th of February late the campaign which so gloriously terminated at Tishomingo Creek was inaugurated. Major-General Sherman with a large and well-appointed army undertook to penetrate the central counties of Alabama and Mississippi. His object was avowedly to capture Selma and Mobile, and to desolate that productive region of country, from which the granaries of a large section of the Confederacy were supplied. Generals Smith and Grierson had their duties assigned them, and were to act a conspicuous part in the work of spoliation and piracy. With a large co-operating cavalry force, thoroughly armed and equipped, they were to descend through Northern Mississippi, carrying fire and sword with them. There you threw yourselves across the rich prairies, a living bulwark, to stay the desolating tide. Compared with the enemy you were but few in numbers, but every man became a hero, for all seemed impressed with the importance of the momentous struggle. You proved yourselves equal to the expectations of the country. You met the proud and exultant enemy. The result is known to the world; you drove him howling back in ignominy and shame; broken and demoralized. Sherman's campaign was thus brought to an abrupt conclusion, and MISSISSIPPI and Alabama saved. The victory was a glorious one, and with heartfelt pride the general commanding acknowledges your unexampled gallantry. This great work was accomplished by Colonel Bell's brigade, commanded by Colonel Barteau, Colonel McCulloch's, and colonel Forrest's brigades. But great as was this victory, it is not without its allow. The laurel is closely entwined with the cypress, and the luster of a brilliant triumph is darkened by the blood with which it was purchased. It was here that Colonel Barksdale gave up his life a willing sacrifice upon the altar of his country. He fell in front of the battle, gallantly discharging his duty. He sleeps, but his name is imperishable. Here, too, fell the noble brother of the general commanding, Colonel Jeffrey E. Forrest. He was a brave and chivalrous spirit, ever foremost in the fight. He fell in the flower of his youth and usefulness, but his dying gaze was proudly turned upon the victorious field, which his own valor had aided in winning. Peace to the ashes of these gallant young heroes.

After a short repose you were called to a new theater of action. By long and rapid marches, which you endured without murmur or complaint, you found yourselves upon the waters of the Ohio, sweeping the enemy before you wherever you met him, capturing hundreds of pris-