War of the Rebellion: Serial 077 Page 0223 Chapter LI. EXPEDITION INTO MISSISSIPPI.

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Lyon, whose brigade was in front, to move forward and develop the enemy, and wrote back to General Buford to move up with the artillery and Bell's brigade as rapidly as the condition of the horses and roads would permit, and ordered him also to send one regiment of Bell's brigade from Old Carrollville across to the Ripley and Guntown road, with orders to gain the rear of the enemy or attack and annoy his rear or flank. Moving forward Colonel Lyon threw out one company as skirmishers, and soon after dismounted his brigade and attacked the enemy's line of cavalry, driving them back to near the cross-roads, at which place his infantry was arriving and being formed. Deserving to avoid a general engagement until the balance of my troops and the artillery came up, Colonel Lyon was not pushed forward, but in order to hold his position secure he made hasty fortifications of rails, logs, and such other facilities as presented themselves. I ordered up Colonel Rucker's brigade, dismounting two regiments and forming them on the left of Colonel Lyon, holding his THIRD regiment, under Colonel Duff, mounted, as a reserve, and throwing it out well on the extreme left to prevent any flank movement on the part of the enemy. Colonel Johnston was also moved into position. We had a severe skirmish with the enemy, which was kept up until 1 o'clock, at which time General Buford arrived with the artillery, followed by Bell's brigade. The enemy had for some time been shelling our position. On the arrival of the batteries I directed General Buford to move them in position and open fire, in order to develop the position of enemy's batteries and his lines. The enemy responded with two guns only. The firing from our batteries was discontinued, while Lyon and Johnson were ordered to move their lines forward. It was now 1 o'clock, and as all my forces were up I prepared to attack him at once. Taking with me my escort and Bell's brigade I moved rapidly around to the Guntown and Ripley road, and advancing on that road, dismounting the brigade, and forming Russell's and Wilson's regiments on the right, extending to Colonel Rucker's left, and placing Newsom's regiment on the left of the road Duff's regiment, of Rucker's brigade, and my escort were placed on the left of Newsom's, and formed the extreme left of my line of battle. Before leaving General Buford I ordered him the moment the attack began on the left to move the center and right rapidly forward. Owing to the density of the undergrowth Colonel Bell was compelled to advance within thirty yards of the enemy before assaulting him. In a few seconds the engagement becam with great fury. The enemy having three lines of battle, the left was being heavily pressed, I sent a staff officer to Colonel Bell was compelled to advance within thirty yards of the enemy before assaulting him. In a few seconds the engagement became general, and on the left raged with great fury. The enemy having three lines of battle, the left was being heavily pressed, I sent a staff officer to General Buford to move Lyon's and Johnson's brigades forward and press the enemy on the right. Newsom's regiment was suffering severely and had given way. Colonel Duff and my escort, dismounted, were ordered to charge the enemy's position in front of Newsom's regiment, and succeeded in driving the enemy to his second line, enabling the regiment to rally, reform, and move forward to a less exposed position. Fearing my order to General Buford had miscarried, I moved forward rapidly along the lines, encouraging my men, until I reached General Buford on the Blackland road, and finding but two pieces of artillery in position and engaged, I directed my aide-de- camp, Captain Anderson, to bring up all the artillery, and ordered General Buford to place it in action at once, which was promptly done. The battle was fierce and the enemy obstinate; but after two hours' hard fighting the enemy gave way, being forced back on his THIRD and last line. Colonel Barteau, in command of the regiment sent from Old Carrollville, had gained the rear of the enemy, and by his presence and