War of the Rebellion: Serial 077 Page 0063 Chapter LI. MORGAN'S RAID INTO Kentucky.

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they fell back. About this time General Hobson took command and further disposition of the forces was made. Not far from 7 o'clock the enemy appeared in large force WEST of the position occupied by us; they dismounted and advanced upon us with loud yells, opening a fierce and well sustained fire, and were resolutely met by our troops and held at bay. After a contest of considerable duration, the enemy having partially flanked our right wing, Companies A and G, which composed it, were ordered to fall back a few rods, which they did under a galling fire, suffering some loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners. The fight continued without lull through the whole length of our front, until between 11 and 12 o'clock, the combatants on both sides taking cover as much as the ground would allow. Several attempts were made to turn our left flank, every one of which failed, and after the last attempt the enemy retired rapidly and in disorder. Large forces of cavalry had been seen passing over the hills in different directions, and fearing an attempt to get in our rear General [Hobson] had ordered small parties to protect the two fords, one to the left and one to the right of our rear, but soon after the firing ceased it was observed that Morgan had thrown large forces across the river, and was approaching in line of battle on two sides, east and south, while Gilter's (or Giltner's) forces had reformed in front. A flag of truce was then sent in, and terms of surrender were offered and accepted; the officers to retain their side-arms, and private property of the soldiers to be respected. General Hobson and staff, Colonel Asper, Lieutenant-Colonel Harmon, and Major Fowler started with a flag of truce, under escort, to communicate with general commanding department touching exchange of officers and parole of men, since which nothing has been heard of the party by the undersigned, excepting newspaper reports. After the surrender many of the arms were burned on the field by order of Morgan as worthless, and the others put into the hands of his unarmed recruits. The line officers and men were marched to town, where the afternoon was spent in preparations for paroling the prisoners, name, and descriptive lists being prepared, &c. In the evening we were marched out of town, together with those of other commands previously taken, and turned into an open field without food and but few blankets. The night was very chilly, and on Sunday morning we were marched out on the Augusta road, taking our line of march by 4 o'clock. We were made to double-quick, miles in succession, fording Licking River, at Claysville, waist deep, and smaller streams many times. Blankets, shoes, and all impediments were thrown away, and with bleeding feet many of the prisoners continued to march only because threatened with death if they fell out. Having reached a distance of perhaps twenty-odd miles, by the route taken, and still without a morsel of food, the officers were told by Morgan if they would accept a parole for themselves and men he would grant it; if not, he would parole the men and take the officers with [him] to Richmond or other point in the Confederacy- mounted, if they would give the parole of honor not to escape; on foot, and at double-quick, if they would not give such parole. The line officers present, consisting of all who had been in the fight, except Lieutenant Earl, of Company I, accepted the parole for themselves and men. The men were also sworn not to bear arms against the Southern Confederacy, or do other military service, till exchanged or released from parole, under the penalty of death. They did not sign any paper. A copy of the parole taken by the officers is herewith transmitted. * The

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*See p. 62.

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