War of the Rebellion: Serial 077 Page 0037 Chapter LI. MORGAN'S RAID INTO Kentucky.

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to Brigadier General John H. Morgan in the shortest time practicable, and by the most direct route, under charge of three officers and one private selected to escort us.

E. H. HOBSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding U. S. Forces.

JOHN S. BUTLER,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

GEORGE G. LOTT,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

W. LEE OSBORN,

Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

J. W. ARNETT,

Second Lieutenant, FIFTY-second Kentucky.

H. R. HARMON,

Lieutenant-Colonel 171st Ohio National Guard.

J. F. ASPER,

Colonel 171st Ohio National Guard.

M. A. FOWLER,

Major 171st Ohio National Guard.

Witness:

B. H. ALLEN,

Inspector-General, Morgan's Cavalry.

No. 6. Report of Colonel David A. Mims, Thirty-ninth Kentucky Infantry, commanding brigade.

HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, FIRST DIV., DIST. OF Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., June 30, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Second Brigade in the recent battle at Cynthiana Ky., fought on the morning of the 12th of June, 1864, between the U. S. forced under the command of Brigadier General S. G. Burbridge and the Confederate forces under General John H. Morgan:

At daylight we came up with the rebels, posted on a hill about one mile and a half from the town of Cynthiana. We found the enemy in line of battle behind a stone wall and a rail fence, which had been so fixed as to afford good protection to their men. When the Second Brigade arrived skirmishing had already begun on the right by the First Brigade. The Second Brigade was immediately formed in line of battle in a corn-field as follows: The Thirty-ninth Kentucky, dismounted, on the right, with the Eleventh Michigan Cavalry, mounted, on the left. In this order the brigade moved up the hill under a terrible fire from the enemy. The Thirty-ninth Kentucky succeeded in reaching the enemy's position with the loss of 1 man killed and 3 or 4 slightly wounded, none of them, however, quitting the ranks. As the regiment gained the wall and fence the enemy fled precipitately, leaving a number of killed and wounded behind. The Eleventh Michigan Cavalry repeatedly charged the rebel lines, driving them in great confusion, until the rebels formed behind a stone wall. From this position they poured a deadly volley into the ranks of the Eleventh Michigan, killing 20 horses. This for a moment checked the advance of the Eleventh Michigan, but it was of short duration. Soon the enemy were again flying before them.