War of the Rebellion: Serial 077 Page 0025 Chapter LI. MORGAN'S RAID INTO Kentucky.

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Paris, and accordingly, at 12 o'clock Friday night, I moved with the command on the road to Paris, arriving at that place about 5 o'clock Saturday morning. There I found the enemy had threatened the town with a small force the day before, but a couple of shells from the guns of Fort Robinson had sent them off in a hurry. During the day heavy cannonading was heard in the direction of Frankfort, and the enemy was reported in force in the neighborhood of Georgetown, but the telegraph lines being cut I was obliged to await the return of the scouts and couriers I had sent out in search of information. About night-fall I received a dispatch from General Hobson, forwarded by Captain Dickson, dated Saturday, June 11, saving he was almost surrounded, and could not hold his position much longer. Somewhat later I received definite intelligence from my scouts that Morgan was at Cynthiana, having taken the place, and destroyed nearly all the business portion of the town, and that General Hobson and surrendered with his command, after an obstinate fight of several hours' duration. For the particulars of General Hobson's proceedings after leaving me on the Big Sandy River, I respectfully refer you to his report, which I inclose as a part of, and supplementary to, this. * Saturday night about 11 o'clock I moved out with the column, which, including Colonel Garrard's brigade, was about 2,400 strong, in the direction of Cynthiana, having previously sent Colonel John Mason Brown on a reconnaissance toward Cynthiana, Millersburg, and Carlisle. Sunday, June 12, at 2. 30 o'clock in the morning, my advance, under Major Tyler, FIFTY-second Kentucky, came up with the enemy's pickets some two miles and a half from the town of Cynthiana, drove them back upon their skirmish line, and held them there until the column closed up. I at once formed my line of battle across the turnpike leading to Millersburg (the road upon which we were advancing), and on either side of it; three dismounted regiments forming the center, with a cavalry regiment on each flank, and the cavalry brigade of Colonel Garrard constituting the reserve, Colonel John M. Brown's brigade, owing to the exhaustive march made reconnoitering the enemy's position, having not yet caught up. At the word "forward" the line advanced with a steadiness never excelled, driving the enemy from their first line. The command "charge" was given, and obeyed with a promptness which spoke well for the spirit of the men, as well as for the training they had received. The enemy were steadily driven, except upon the flanks, where, ensconced behind stone walls and high rail fences, they so impeded the cavalry attack as to make it necessary to send additional force to their assistance. I ordered Colonel Garrard to send one cavalry regiment to the right, and one to the left to attack the extreme flanks of the enemy, still leaving one cavalry regiment in reserve. Finding the enemy was repulsing the advance upon the left, owing to their defenses improvised from stone walls, &., the remaining reserve (Seventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry) was ordered to the left to assist in the charge, which was most brilliantly made by the entire cavalry force, aided by the dismounted men, and which succeeded in making a most complete rout of the enemy in the quarter from which came the most desperate resistance. Mean time the center and right had carried the town from their respective positions, the enemy having fled in the wildest confusion, many being drowned in their attempt to cross the river, the only other avenue to escape having been blocked by my troops on the right. Having learned from citizens and pris

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*See p. 33.

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