War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 1026 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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mean time. The general also directs me to say that if you choose to fight to-morrow that he thinks there is very little difficulty in crossing below Florence, if, after fighting, you should think it best to cross.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. T. PARRISH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Since writing above General Roddey directs me to say that he will most probably cross the river in person at Green's Bluff, two miles and a half of Centre Star, but will have couriers at Lamb's Ferry also, where he has one section of artillery.

J. T. PARRISH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

LOVEJOY'S STATION, GA., September 6, 1864.

Colonel F. R. LUBBOCK:

DEAR SIR: My attention has just been directed to the announcement of your arrival in Macon, en route to Richmond, to take position on President Davis' staff. I rejoice very much over this intelligence, for the Texas troops recognize in you a friend, freely sympathizing with them in their sufferings, and fully appreciating the sacrifices they have made in their long separation from home and families, and I feel assured of your deep and abiding interest in whatever pertains to the honor of our State or the success of the great cause, dear alike to us all; and I do not, therefore, hesitate to inform you of the true condition of my command, trusting in securing your influence in its behalf. While in Mississippi an order was obtained, through Lieutenant-General Polk, permitting the regiments of my brigade to go home on furlough to recruit their depleted ranks. Before the order was carried into effect, another was received suspending the privilege upon the ground that our services were just then much needed, and we started to General Forrest's assistance in Tennessee. At Grenada, however, we were informed that we were no longer required in that quarter and were directed to Columbus, Miss. There Lieutenant-General Polk received the brigade and informed the men that his word was pledged to furlough them, and his promises should be fulfilled so soon as the emergency demanding their services should be over. There had been no murmuring and all were satisfied. From Columbus we came to this department, and since our arrival the brigade has lost in battle one-fourth its effective strength, and it would scarcely make one regiment now.

During the campaign it has received the special commendation and complimentary orders from superior officers after almost every engagement. You are aware that their original term of service and enlistment was twelve months, and in leaving their families and property they did not anticipate a more protracted absence, and hence did not make preparation for the wants of their families or protection of property, but by an act of Congress they were continued in service for a term of three years, and now that term has expired. Lieutenant-General Polk has been killed, and they have despaired of receiving furloughs, and I am convinced beyond the shadow of a doubt that the greater portion of them, if not all, will go to the Trans-Mississippi Department as soon as the enemy ceases to advance in Georgia. When in Mississippi one man of every twenty-five effective was furloughed, and thus all could com-