War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 1023 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--CONFEDERATE.

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LOVEJOY'S STATION, GA., September 6, 1864.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

Richmond, Va.:

Your dispatches of the 5th instant received. I ordered General Cobb to have these troops returned to Augusta and Columbus, as the information through scouts was that the enemy was about making another raid in that direction, and I could easily bring them up when I was ready to give battle. The enemy have now withdrawn in the direction of Jonesborough, and I think will take position at East Point, Atlanta, and Decatur to recruit his army and prepare for another campaign. I am making, and shall still make, every possible effort to gather the absentees of this army. Shoes and clothing are very much needed. Detailed men I think had better for the present remain in the workshops, as they cannot march and fight. I shall continue to interrupt as much as possible the communications of the enemy, and hope that Taylor's forces will soon cross the river. I would be glad if yourself or General Bragg would visit the army.

J. B. HOOD.

LOVEJOY'S STATION, GA., September 6, 1864--7 a. m.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Richmond:

The enemy withdrew from my front in the direction of Jonesborough last night.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

September 6, 1864.

Honorable J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

Sherman continues his retreat beyond Jonesborough.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

(Same to General Bragg.)

LOVEJOY'S STATION, GA., September 6, 1864.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

Richmond, Va.:

I shall make dispositions to prevent the enemy, as far as possible, from foraging south of Atlanta, and at the same time endeavor to prevent his massing supplies at that place. I deem it important that the prisoners at Andersonville should be so disposed of as not to prevent this army from moving in any direction it may be thought best. According to all human calculations we should have saved Atlanta had the officers and men of the army done what was expected of them. It has been God's will for it to be otherwise. I am of good heart and feel that we shall yet succeed. The army is much in need of a little rest. After removing the prisoners from Andersonville, I think we should, as soon as practicable, place our army upon the communications of the enemy, drawing our supplies from the West Point and Montgomery Railroad.