War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 1016 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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north, as it is reported the enemy moved out on the McDonough road from Jonesborough to-day. General Hardee's line of battle crosses the railroad, running east and west, about half a mile in front of Lovejoy's Station. From your present position you should come into the road leading to Lovejoy's at or near Mount Carmel Church, approaching Hardee's position rather from the north. Should he be driven from his position to-night I hope to inform you in time. That would make it necessary for you to move south on the Griffin road.

[F. A. SHOUP,

Chief of Staff.]

SEPTEMBER 2, 1864--6.50 p. m.

Lieutenant-General LEE,

Commanding Corps:

General Hood desires you to leave a brigade in your rear as a vanguard, if there be any wagons or artillery not yet come up, if you think necessary.

[F. A. SHOUP,

Chief of Staff.]

LOVEJOY'S STATION, September 3, 1864.

General BRAXTON BRAGG, Richmond:

On the evening of the 30th the enemy made a lodgment across Flint River, near Jonesborough. We attacked them on the evening of the 31st with two corps, failing to dislodge them. This made it necessary to abandon Atlanta, which was done on the night of September 1. Our loss on the evening of the 31st was so small that it is evident that our effort was not a vigorous one. On the evening of September 1 General Hardee's corps, in position at Jonesborough, was assaulted by a superior force of the enemy, and being outflanked was forced to withdraw during the night to this point, with the loss of 8 pieces of artillery. The enemy's prisoners report their loss very severe. I send a bearer of dispatches to-morrow.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

LOVEJOY'S STATION, September 3, 1864.

General BRAXTON BRAGG, Richmond:

Major General Edward Johnson has been assigned to command General P. Anderson's division.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

LOVEJOY'S STATION, GA., September 3, 1864--1.45 p. m.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Richmond, Va.:

For the offensive, my troops at present are not more than equal to their own numbers. To prevent this country from being overrun re-enforcements are absolutely necessary.

J. B. HOOD.