War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0951 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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mand nearer to this place, so as to get yourself in readiness. General Shoup informs him that Captain Norton did not come to these headquarters in reference to the horseshoes; also a good portion of those collected by Colonel beckham have been left here untouched. It will not be well for you to take up your line of march without being fairly equipped for it. he thinks you will save time by moving nearer to the main body of the army. You will please order Colonel Clinch's regiment to report to General Morgan.

[L. P. DODGE,

Aide-de-Camp.]

P. S.-The general desires me to say that he is not disappointed in the least, and directs as above in case you cannot make effective preparation where you now are. He thinks your preparations will be facilitated by a nearer approach to the main body. he doubts being able to send Ross, even if you should move on the enemy at once. You will, therefore, make your plans, not counting upon General Ross' cooperation. if the general is able to sent him it will be a piece of good fortune. a telegram has been received stating that the had been sent to Social Circle by a special messenger.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS'

HDQRS. ARMY OF TENNESSEE, Numbers 71.

In the Field, august 8, 1864.

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III. Brigadier General Z. C. Deas, Provisional Army, C. S., will report Major General Patton Anderson, for assignment to a brigade in his division.

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By command of General Hood:

KINLOCH FALCONER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ATLANTA, GA., August 9, 1864.

His Excellency President DAVIS, Richmond, Va.:

The Nineteenth Army Corps having gone to Virginia or Washington City, the infantry force threatening Mobile cannot be more than 7,000 at the most, after leaving a garrison at New Orleans and in Louisiana All that is necessary at Mobile is 7,000 men, as 6,000 will men the trenches. The reserve and militia of Alabama are thought to be ample. None but small boats can get near to Mobile, and the heaviest batteries are near the city. This information in regard to Mobile I got from Lieutenant-General Lee. The force at Holly Spring is the same or less Lee compelled to retreat. I suggest that the Trans-Mississippi troops come here. If they, or a part of them, are retained in Mississippi Forrest should go to Middle Tennessee, as the force at Holly Springs cannot march to Mobile with Forrest or a part of the Trans-Mississippi troops to oppose them. To march the Trans-Mississippi troops to Middle Tennessee may be too late, as they have to equip themselves with transportation. To hold Atlanta I have to hold East Point. The enemy gradually extending to East Point, and hope to force me give up Atlanta or to fight him at great disadvantage to us. I am making dispositions which will, I hope, enable me to hold both East Point and Atlanta.

J. B. HOOD,

General.