War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0903 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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ATLANTA, July 23, 1864.

Honorable J. A. SEDDON,

Richmond:

In the engagement of yesterday we captured 18 stand of colors instead of 5, and 13 guns instead of 22, as previously reported. Brigadier-General Mercer not wounded. All quiet to-day except skirmishing, and the enemy occasionally throwing shell into the city. The army is in good spirits.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

PETERSBURG, July 23, 1864.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS:

Mr. PRESIDENT: I have had the honor to receive your letter of yesterday relative to our supply of corn. If the news of the glorious victory at Atlanta, reported this morning, prove true it will again open to us Alabama and East Mississippi, and remove a part of the great weight pressing upon us. But as far as I informed there is till a large supply of corn in East Georgia, and with what could be collected in South and North Carolina there would be enough to support us till the new corp is available. That which is not in Richmond should be reserved if possible, and every effort made to increase the supply. The destruction of the railroad bridges beyond Greensborough is a serious evil. I understand it was done by incendiaries, which makes it more lamentable. Those bridges will therefore have to be guarded by the reserves, like thos exposed to the enemy. The trains arrived last night from Weldon, but brought only sufficient corn for the cavalry. That was some relief, but obliges us still to diminish our reserve.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS,

July 23, 1864.

His Excellency Governor BROWN:

The State troops under Major-General Smith fought with great gallantry in the action of yesterday.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Macon, July 23, 1864.

General J. B. HOOD, Atlanta:

I am proud to hear of the gallant conduct of the State troops. Thousands of others have now assembled in response to my call, and will be armed and sent forward as rapidly as possible, who upon the soil of their beloved State will strike with equal valor for the defense of their wives and their children, their homes and their altars. I assure you of the most energetic co-operation with all the aid in my power. May God grant you success and aid to drive the invaders from the soil of the Confederacy.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.