War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0900 Chapter L. THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN.

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HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS,

July 21, 1864-11 p. m.

General CLEBURNE:

By direction of Lieutenant-General Hardee, your division will move at 1 o'clock to-night on the road which will be indicated by the guide. Your skirmishers will be left on the line you occupied to-day.

Respectfully,

T. B. ROY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Your division follows Walker's.

Respectfully,

T. B. ROY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Your skirmishers [will] remain out until driven in.

By order of Lieutenant-General Hardee:

T. B. ROY.

HEADQUARTERS, July 21, 1864.

Brigadier-General WRIGHT, Commanding, Atlanta, Ga.:

GENERAL: I am directed to inform you that you must be prepared to-night for an evacuation of Atlanta, should it become necessary. You will, therefore, without saying anything about it, be prepared to move when Lieutenant-General Stewart's troops move into town, should the evacuation take place.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. P. MASON,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

NEAR ATLANTA, July 22, 1864-10.30 p. m.

Honorable J. A. SEDDON, Richmond:

The army shifted its position last night, fronting Peach Tree Creek, and formed line of battle around the city with Stewart's and Cheatham's corps. General Hardee, with his corps, made a night march and attacked the enemy's extreme left at 1 o'clock to-day; drove him from his works, capturing 16 pieces of artillery and 5 stand of colors. Major-General Cheatham attacked the enemy at 4 p. m. with a portion of his command; drove the enemy, capturing 6 pieces of artillery. During the engagements we captured about 2,000 prisoners, but loss not fully ascertained. Major-General Walker killed; Brigadier-General Smith, Gist, and Mercer wounded. Our troops fought with great gallantry.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, July 22, 1864.

Lieutenant-General HARDEE:

Several more of my scouts have come in, all corroborating the report I sent you this morning that General Garrard had moved toward Covington with his division. Shall I pursue and break up Garrard, or shall I detach a force to follow him?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. WHEELER,

Major-General.