War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0876 Chapter L. THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN.

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on to re-enforce Sherman or cover his line of communication, as the one or the other should be most necessary to counteract or overcome the operation against him. If General Adams and the fragmentary organizations in Southern Mississippi be withdrawn, there will [be] little difficulty in a movement by the enemy from Vicksburg and the points below it to Selma for the destruction of the valuable machinery and material collected there, as well as the large supplies in that part of Alabama. I have heretofore expressed my estimate of the value of the supplies in the localities named in connection with the maintenance of your army.

Senator Hill has arrived, and after conversing with him I have called for exact statements from the War Department, after the receipt of which I will endeavor to reply to the various propositions and reflections which have been presented to me.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

[Indorsement.]

MACON, July 24, 1864-8.30 a. m.

This letter just received by a messenger, who reports that he left Richmond with Colonel Waddell on the 20th instant. The colonel stopped on the way and directed him to deliver the letter.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

NEAR ATLANTA, July 11, 1864.

General BRAGG:

I strongly recommend the distribution of the U. S. prisoners, now at Andersonville, immediately.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

NEAR ATLANTA, July 11, 1864.

General B. BRAGG:

GENERAL: Can I get the two Louisiana regiments in Quarles' brigade for Gibson? And can I have Brigadier General J. C. Brown promoted to command Hindman's division? It is very important.

J. B. HOOD,

Lieutenant-General.

GENERAL FIELD ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF TENNESSEE, Numbers 3.

July 11, 1864.

Intercourse between the pickets of the enemy and our own is strictly and positively prohibited. Officer of all grades are required to watch over the enforcement of this order, and to punish every infraction. General Johnston appeals to the good sense of the army to put an end to a practice so dangerous. Yesterday the enemy had a great interest in finding the fords in the Chattahoochee, and easily attained their object, the pickets by mutual agreement bathing in the river together. The engineers of the enemy most probably mingle with the bathers.

By command of General Johnston:

A. P. MASON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.