War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0847 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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TULLAHOMA, September 10, 1864.

Major B. H. POLK,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have learned from a man who was pressed for a guide by that party of rebels seen northwest of Shelbyville yesterday morning that they were 108 strong, and were sent by Williams to meet Wheeler at Muscle Shoals, on the Tennessee River, and were to cross the railroad fifteen miles south of Columbia, and were to report to Wheeler that Williams was out of ammunition, and if attacked would have to surrender, and asked Wheeler to try to make a diversion in their favor south of the Tennessee River and above Chattanooga.

R. H. MILROY,

Major-General.

FLORENCE, ALA., September 10, 1864-11 a.m.

Captain EDWIN E. WOODMAN:

SIR: We met the enemy one mile east of this place, drove them into the town, where they took cover, from which we drove them. The enemy is said to be under command of Johnson, and to be two regiments and one battalion strong. Mrs. Boddeker reports that the enemy were crossing at the mouth of Cypress Creek, one mile and a half below here. All last night they were crossing by ferry. As soon as possible I will report the facts.

Respectfully,

GEO. W. JACKSON,

Colonel Ninth Indiana Cavalry.

HEADQUARTERS INDIANA BRIGADE,

Three miles and a half from Florence, on Military Road,

[September 10, 1864.]

Captain EDWIN E. WOODMAN,

Aide-de-Camp:

SIR: I sent a battalion of the Tenth Indiana Cavalry to Kennedy's Ford and below. They report no enemy seen and the boats removed from ferry. Just as I reached this place three men, belonging to a detachment of twenty-six men sent out by Colonel Spalding in direction of Pride's Ferry, caught with the command, and report that they were attacked by a force variously estimated at from 100 to 600 men near Cheatham's Ford. Learning this, I sent one battalion of the Tenth Indiana in direction of Florence to assist them and save those whose horses were exhausted, if possible, and to hold the advance of the enemy in check until I could communicate with you. I don't suppose the force is a large one. I will wait here until I hear from the battalion sent to Florence. It will be late before I can get in. If you have any orders that I have not received, please send them by bearer. Since writing the above twelve of the twenty-six men from Colonel Spalding's command have reported. From all the information I can gather the force that attacked them is the same that I drove down the river this morning.

Respectfully,

GEO. W. JACKSON,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.