War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0815 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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brought into question, and the responsibility for and the cause of the unnecessary delay, and very considerable confusion of last evening, can be traced to and thrown upon the officer or officers deserving.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. KILPATRICK,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near Jonesborough, Ga., September 6, 1864.

Brigadier General J. KILPATRICK,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

I received your through your own aide-de-camp and also through Captain Conn, of my staff. As no ill consequence grew out of last night's operations I do not wish to investigate, except in so far as is necessary to prevent future disaster. I did not contemplate that you would move on the same road with the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Corps, except in so far as was necessary to cover the rear of those columns with cavalry. Cavalry cannot move across an infantry column or along the same road with it without unpleasant collisions. I have already called General Blair's attention to the matter of the trains. I appreciate, general, and so do the officers of my command, the great service that you have rendered us during the late operations, and through you thank your officers and men. Please to scout thoroughly toward Fayetteville, so as to be apprised if the enemy throw any considerable force across Flint River, either cavalry or infantry, or both, during the night.

Respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

LAWRENCEBURG, September 6, 1864-7.40 a.m.

Major General L. H. ROUSSEAU:

GENERAL: I have arrived in town; enemy have gone; I am pushing on after them as fast as possible.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier-General.

ON LAMB'S FERRY ROAD,

Thirteen and a half miles from Lawrenceburg,

[September 6, 1864]-2.40 o'clock.

Major-General ROUSSEAU:

GENERAL: I am now thirteen miles and a half from Lawrenceburg. I suppose when you wrote you must have thought me only a short distance in front of you. I have halted my command where I received your dispatch, and await further orders. I have been unwell all the morning. It will be impossible for me to ride back to you and return here and be a particle of service in the farther pursuit of Wheeler. The enemy is about an hour in advance of us. I have very little doubt but he will go to the river to-night and attempt to cross. As Roddey's command has been up the road he will keep Roddey as a shield to him while he crosses the river. Roddey will probably be fresh enough to get away.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.