War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0810 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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by which your command is to march, from one leading all the way to Atlanta, on the east of the railroad, to what is called the Flat Shoal road, which runs from Jonesborough, on the west side of the railroad and very near it, until near the new station north of Rough and Ready, where it crosses the railroad. You will then march by a route, which will be pointed out to you by the guide which I send with this, to the Decatur and Faytteville road, at Sykes' house, about a mile beyond which the right of your column will rest to-morrow night, forming with the Fourteenth Corps a line of battle facing southward. If you will send a staff officer to go with me in the morning I will point out to him the direction of your line for to-morrow night. We break camp at 6 a.m. to-morrow.

Yours, respectfully,

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Jonesborough, September 6, 1864-5 p.m.

General KIMBALL:

GENERAL: The troops of this corps will move at 7 a.m. to-morrow precisely. They will be drawn out ready to start at that hour. The leading division will draw out along the railroad, with the head of column resting opposite the present corps headquarters.

By order of Major-General Stanley:

J. S. FULLERTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Same to General Newton and Colonel Post.)

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

At Smith's House, September 6, 1864.

[Brigadier General WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE:]

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that in pursuance of orders my troops were withdrawn during this morning from their position near Jonesborough, and are now in line of battle facing southward upon a ridge just north of the battle-field of the 1st instant. Colonel Taylor's brigade, forming my rear guard, was quite heavily pressed by the enemy when falling back from its position on the south side of the town, and lost some officers and men killed and wounded. The enemy's skirmishers entered the town before Colonel Taylor had withdrawn from it. Colonel Taylor's brigade now occupies the rebel works on my front as an outlying picket, supported on the right by a regiment of General Morgan and on the left by a regiment of General Baird's division. I have to-day received four deserters from the enemy and captured 12 prisoners of war.

I am, very respectfully,

JEF. C. DAVIS,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.