War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0777 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Jonesborough, September 2, 1864-7.30 a.m.

Order of the day for the Fourth Army Corps for to-day:

The troops of this corps will march at once, moving southward after the enemy. The column will move on the railroad, and the artillery, ambulances, and headquarters trains will move on the dirt road on this side of the railroad. General Newton's division will lead, followed by General Wood's, then General Kimball's.

By order of Major-General Stanley:

WM. H. SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NEAR LOVEJOY'S STATION

Twenty-six miles south of Atlanta, Ga.,

September 3, 1864-6 a.m.

(Received 5.30 p.m. 4th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Washington, D. C.:

As already reported, the army drew from about Atlanta, and on the 30th had made a good break of the West Point road and reached a good position from which to strike the Macon railroad, the right (General Howard's) near Jonesborough the left (General Schofield's) near Rough and Ready, and the center (General Thomas) at Couch's. General Howard found the enemy in force at Jonesborough, and intrenched his troops, the salient within half a mile of the railroad. The enemy attacked him at 3 p.m., and was easily repulsed, leaving his dead and wounded. Finding strong opposition on the right, I advanced the left and center rapidly to the railroad, made a good lodgment, and broke it all the way from Rough and Ready down to Howard's left, near Jonesborough and by the same movement I interposed my whole army between Atlanta and the part of the enemy intrenched in and around Jonesborough. We made a general attack on the enemy at Jonesborough on September 1, the Fourteenth Corps, General Jeff. C. Davis, carrying the works handsomely, with 10 guns and about 1,000 prisoners. In the night the enemy retreated south, and we have followed him to another of his well-chosen and hastily constructed lines, near Lovejoy's. Hood, at Atlanta, finding me on his road, the only one that could supply him, and between him and a considerable part of his army, blew up his magazines in Atlanta and eft in the night- time, when the Twentieth Corps, General Slocum, took possession of the place. So Atlanta is ours, and fairly won. I shall not push much farther on this raid, but in a day or so will move to Atlanta and give my men some rest. Since May 5 we have been in one constant battle or skirmish, and need rest. Our losses will not exceed 1,200 and we have possession of over 300 rebel dead, 250 wounded, and over 1,500 well prisoners.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

September 3, 1864.

Major-General SLOCUM, Atlanta:

Accept my thanks for your telegram communicating the welcome news from Atlanta. Please keep me advised of events.

EDWIN M. STANTON

Secretary of War.