War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0770 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Jonesborough, Ga., September 2, 1864.

Brigadier General K. GARRARD, Commanding Second Division Cavalry:

You will, with your division, feel up in the direction of Atlanta. Rebels report the city in our possession. Let us know the exact state of affairs. Send scouts in the direction of Flat Rock and roads leading toward Decatur. General Davis' corps is left here to cover the trains. You have authority from Generals Sherman and Thomas to open any dispatches for the from the direction of Atlanta. Send them forward via this place to Lovejoy's. Lee's corps is reported to have gone from here to Atlanta, and to be returning to join Hardee at Lovejoy's.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. ELLIOTT,

Brigadier-General, and Chief of Cavalry.

HDQRS. THIRD CAV. DIV. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Glass' Bridge, on Flint River, September 2, 1864-4.30 p.m.

Major-General HOWARD, or

Brigadier-General ELLIOTT:

GENERAL; The enemy are still passing to the right and on a road this side of the railroad, artillery, infantry, wagons, and cavalry, but my force is too weak to break through the infantry and cavalry line, which is now protecting the flank of this moving column. Heavy columns of dust can be seen along the line of the railroad and in the direction of McDonough. I feel quite confident that the enemy are retreating. I have sent over several messengers asking for information as to the intended movements of our army, in order that I might know how to maneuver my cavalry, and also for instructions. The required information has not been sent me. My instructions from General Elliott are that, if I find the enemy to be retreating down the railroad, I must move my command quickly to the vicinity of Fayette Station and Griffin and annoy his flank until our army moves upon his rear. There are no bridges below this point; all are burned, and the river is too wide for me to rebuild them. I am now but fifteen miles from Griffin and will make every effort to carry out the general's instructions. I suppose our army to be moving down the railroad. I have a good bridge built at this point, and have had some very sharp fighting, the enemy using artillery, with cavalry, supported by infantry. Two of our prisoners have just come into my lines, having escaped from Andersonville.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. KILPATRICK

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

September 2, 1864-10.30 p.m.

Respectfully forwarded.

In the absence of instructions as to the movements of the army for to-morrow, and on account of General Kilpatrick's inability to cross Flint River, instructions have been sent him to communicate with the right of the army and let his movements conform thereto.

W. L. ELLIOTT,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Cavalry.

(Forwarded to General Sherman by General Thomas.)