War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0750 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Renfroe's, Ga., September 1, 1864.

Brigadier General J. KILPATRICK,

Commanding Third Division Cavalry:

I am directed by the general commanding to say that should the enemy retreat south you will hurry to Fayette Station and Griffin and hang on his flank, while the Army of the Cumberland pushes him to the rear. Send information as to the movements of the enemy as soon as you learn anything of them.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DAVID F. HOW,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD CAVALRY DIVISION,

On Flint River, September 1, 1864.

Lieutenant DAVID F. HOW,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

LIEUTENANT: A citizen came into my lines near the burnt bridge over Flint River on the Jonesborough road. He has been sent to General Howard's headquarters. He came from Macon last evening and left Jonesborough at sunrise this a. m. He reports that the rebel army is strengthening and extending their lines about Jonesborough; that no troops are moving down the railroad, but all are in position and busily at work; that the railroad as far down as Griffin is guarded by cavalry only; that last evening General Hood was in Atlanta with one corps of regular troops and the Georgia militia, and that Hardee with his own and Lee's corps was at Jonesborough, and although the repulse was quite disastrous, Hood intended to hold Jonesborough and if possible Atlanta. For the last hour the enemy has been extending his works along the line of railroad in direction of the bridge on Fayetteville road. Several regiments can be seen at work. I do not think from all I can learn that the enemy is at present retreating. Rest assured that I will not be slow to strike him when an opportunity offers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. KILPATRICK,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near Jonesborough, Ga., September 1, 1864.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report the following as the result of the operations of this army to-day: The Seventeenth Corps, which was on my left, was, about 3.30 o'clock this p. m., relieved by the Fourteenth Corps, and by your instructions ordered to the right. Major-General Blair reports that he has one division across the river and has advanced a heavy skirmish line and finds the enemy in strong position. The operations of the cavalry to-day are given in the inclosed note from General Kilpatrick. During the attack of the Fourteenth Corps the Fifteenth Corps made a vigorous demonstration on the enemy, and at some points, drove them from their skirmish pits into their main line,page751 [CHAP. L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

capturing some prisoners. This movement was also participated in by General Ransom, commanding Sixteenth Corps, all having been made to create a diversion in favor of the attacking column on the left. Casualties for the day not yet reported.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. THIRD CAV. DIV., DEPT, OF THE CUMBERLAND,

On Flint River, September 1, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel CLARK

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Tennessee:

COLONEL: General Blair has arrived at this point. I am moving with my entire command to the bridge below. A train of cars passed down to Lovejoy's Station two hours ago loaded with infantry. They are now intrenching above Lovejoy's Station. This is the only infantry on the railroad between Jonesborough and Griffin.

Very respectfully,

J. KILPATRICK,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, September 1, 1864-8 p.m.

Major-General HOWARD,

Commanding Army of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: In order that you may act advisedly, I will merely state that Jonesborough is of no value to us, but we are now trying to cripple and destroy the army now there. Thomas will push him in the direction of the railroad south. Schofield will operate on the east and you on the west of the railroad. If he retreats we will follow without halt or delay, if possible, to Griffin. If he remains in Jonesborough we must envelop him and destroy his communications south, as they are already destroyed north. Your troops are now well disposed, and Blair can do good service by feeling out and reaching the railroad if possible. He should not be content with a cavalry break, but one of some extent, and well done. Send worth to Osterhaus to have his artillery officers listen for the cars to-night, and if heard to open artillery on them at random. If the enemy retreats I think you could make best progress by marching rapidly to Fayetteville, and then toward Griffin, falling on the flanks of the enemy. I suppose the bridge is destroyed, but General Thomas has a pontoon train that could march there in one day. This train is at Renfroe's, eight miles from Fayetteville, from which there are several roads across Flint River, the one fulfilling most conditions being the one toward Fayette Station. Still, if you can learn of roads east of Flint River that will be available and yet not bring you in contact with Thomas' troops it would be the safest as all the army will then be together and no part separated by an impassable stream. Should the enemy remain in Jonesborough to-morrow hold your line as now, and give to Blair's movements all the force you can.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.,