War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0749 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Renfroe's House, September 1, 1864.

Major General H. W. SLOCUM,

Commanding Twentieth Army Corps:

GENERAL: There is but little doubt that the three corps of the rebel army are now at Jonesborough. This is the concurrent testimony of the prisoners captured. If this is the case, it is undoubtedly Hood's intention to evacuate the place, and has at this time, probably, only a force of militia there for the purpose of getting away the heavy artillery and stores. If this is the case, you might possibly by a dash capture the place with artillery and stores. The major-general commanding directs that you make the effort, but without exposing the tete-de-pont to capture. The Fourteenth Corps this afternoon made a spirited assault upon the enemy's works, capturing a line of intrenchments, 2 batteries of artillery, 2 stand of colors, and about 200 prisoners.

Yours, very respectfully,

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH CORPS,

Chattahoochee River, Ga., September 1, 1864.

Brigadier General J. W. GEARY,

Commanding Second Division:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that you send out to-morrow morning in the direction of Atlanta a reconnoitering party of about 500 men to ascertain the position and intention of the enemy. Please report all information obtained immediately on the return of the expedition. General Ward also sends out a party of 1,000 men for the same purpose.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. PERKINS,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Renfroe's, Ga., September 1, 1864.

Brigadier General J. KILPATRICK,

Commanding Third Division Cavalry:

I am directed by the general commanding to say that you will, with your command, closely watch the enemy, and should he retreat you will harass him as much as possible by keeping on his flank and rear; and should the retreat be in the direction of Macon the Army of the Cumberland will follow him as far as Griffin. Whenever the opportunity offers to break the railroad without much risk, do so. Give the earliest reliable information of the movements of the enemy.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DAVID F. HOW,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.