War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0672 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Before Atlanta, Ga., August 26, 1864.

Brigadier General T. E. G. RANSOM,

Commanding Left Wing, Sixteenth Army Corps:

Major-Generals Logan and Blair will commence their movement to-night at 8 o'clock. Lieutenant-Colonel Strong will superintend the withdrawal of the pickets and skirmishers.

By order of Major General O. O. Howard:

SAML. L. TAGGART,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. SIGNAL DETACH., FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Atlanta, August 26, 1864.

Major General JOHN A. LOGAN,

Commanding Fifteenth Army Corps:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following as my report for to-day:

Lieutenant Fish, of this detachment, was on the station at 7.30 a. m. and reports the following:

The enemy could be seen, gathered in groups, looking intently toward our late lines. At 10.15 a. m. a train of five freight-cars left Atlanta; they appeared to be loaded. At 11 a. m. a few straggling rebels could be seen rambling about the works lately held by the Twentieth Army Corps. These stragglers picked up a few of our men that straggled behind, probably from the Fourth Army Corps, as a portion of that corps were in that vicinity. At 11.30 a. m. a locomotive left Atlanta alone. At 1 p. m. I discovered a column of infantry moving toward the enemy's left. I did not see the head of column; counted five stand of colors; a portion of the column was mounted infantry, about 300. At 3.15 p. m. a train of twelve box-cars, all empty, arrived in Atlanta. At 4.15 p. m. a train of three passenger and four freight cars arrived in Atlanta with a few passengers aboard. At 5.45 p. m. a train of fifteen freight-cars, a portion of which were cattle-cars, arrived in Atlanta; there were a few men in each car. At 6 p. m. a train of seventeen freight-cars, loaded with what few men in each car. At 6 p. m. a train of seventeenth freight-cars, loaded with what appeared to be army stores, left town; immediately following this freight train was a train of six passenger and two baggage cars, with two extra locomotives attached.

Lieutenant Weirick, of this detachment, reports the following:

All quiet and unchanged, with the exception of rebel skirmishers, who kept up a constant fire at our skirmishers on main lines of Fifteenth Army Corps. At 6 p. m. communicated movements to our right and front.

As for myself, I was on the lookout station most of the day, and indorse the above statement of Lieutenant Fish.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL EDGE,

First Lieutenant and Chief Acting Signal Officer.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Mount Gilead, Ga., August 26, 1864.

General STEEDMAN,

Chattanooga:

If Wheeler goes up into East Tennessee beyond the Holston let him go. The people must rally and destroy bridges and roads, and worry him. He cannot do us any harm, but will simply consume the grain