War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0603 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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SHERMAN'S HEADQUARTERS, August 19, 1864. (Received 8.45 p .m.)

General SCHOFIELD:

According to the doctrine of chances, on the supposition that Kilpatrick breaks the road, of which, I think, there is no doubt, the enemy should try to break our center. Therefore, let orders be made that in case of any indications of such an event the wings will close on the center. The center is defined to be from the Buck Head road, Newton's, to the poor-house, or the Fifteenth Corps.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

(Same to Generals Thomas and Howard.)

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 19, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

In my present position I hold my lines with very light force, keeping reserves where they can be quickly concentrated at any point. I do not quite understand whether you mean that the wings shall close upon the center upon indication of an attempt to break our center, or not until an indication that it is broken.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, near Atlanta, August 19, 1864-12 midnight.

General SCHOFIELD:

The notice to close on the center was given in case of the center being broken and communication between the parts cut off. Otherwise the operations begun to-day to continue till General Kilpatrick is back.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE, August 19, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I have ordered an immediately demonstration along my entire front. I fear Hood has ample time to move his troops by cars to the point threatened, but I hope not.

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, near Atlanta, August 19, 1864-11.15 a. m.

General HOWARD:

General Kilpatrick reported last night at 11 o'clock he would be on the road at 12.30 to-day. He will cut the road and force the infantry to disembark. No train can carry more than 800 men, and General Kilpatrick can work on both sides of that train. Being mounted he can