War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0582 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Near Atlanta, Ga., August 18, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I have extended my line for more than a mile substantially parallel to that of the enemy and have a pretty good flank. The enemy's works appear to be occupied only in moderate force. They have shown no movement during the day. I propose to-night to draw out two brigades of each division of the Fourteenth Corps, leaving one brigade of each division, including Hascall's, to hold the present lines. This will give me a movable force of about 18,000 men with which to make my movement against the enemy's left. This will of course leave our lines very weak, but I reckon strong enough against any probable attack.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

SCHOFIELD'S HEADQUARTERS,

August 18, 1864.

General SHERMAN:

Our demonstrations show no apparent diminution of the enemy's force in front of the Fourteenth Corps.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, August 18, 1864-11.30 a. m.

General SCHOFIELD:

Our telegraph now works to Chattanooga. The conclusion my mind has arrived at is that Hood sent Wheeler's cavalry to occupy our road at Dalton; that he had re-enforced East Point with a division of his old corps, which last night was brought back on the supposition that Wheeler had succeeded, and we would begin to detach to our rear. Now, of all times, is the time four our cavalry to do its work well, and if you hear nothing from me before 3 o'clock, send a messenger to General Kilpatrick with a note stating that all things are most favorable for his work; to break as much of the Macon road as he possibly can, and, as he swings back, to rest on the West Point road at come point below Fairburn, and make another big tear up. If he feels master of the situation on the road he cannot tear up to much track nor twist too much iron. It may save this army the necessity of making a long, hazardous flank march. Tell him what you will do to-morrow to occupy the enemy's infantry on that flank, and assure him I will cause the same along our whole line, especially on our extreme left. I will see that General Garrard risks all he can to amuse what cavalry the enemy has about Decatur and Stone Mountain.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

SCHOFIELD'S HEADQUARTERS,

August 18, 1864.

General SHERMAN:

Your dispatch is received. At 3 o'clock I will send an officer to General Kilpatrick with a letter explaining your wishes, and also what will be done by the infantry to aid him.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.