War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0573 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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course that I have suspended the movement contemplated for to-night until General Kilpatrick tries his hand. Keep the big guns going, and damage Atlanta all that is possible.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

August 18, 1864-11.55 a. m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Signal officer at Howard's house reports at 10 a. m. a heavy cannonading for about half an hour previous in direction south 20 degrees east from his position. Some of the shells burst over the north part of Atlanta. I send this that you may know what batteries were firing and where the shells reached. But little picket-firing in my front now, though it was quite sharp for three or four hours from daylight.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

(Same to Generals Schofield and Howard).

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, August 18, 1864-12 m.

General THOMAS:

General Kimball's report is received and is perfectly satisfactory. The movement from the enemy's left to right last night was the division sent to East Point when General Schofield was feeling that flank a little too close for Hood's comfort. It was recalled last night on the supposition that Wheeler was on our road and we would be sending back. Time and circumstances all favor the Kilpatrick move, and I hope he will make a good job.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, August 18, 1865-1.15 p. m.

General THOMAS:

The shots that go so deep into the city are from 10-pounder Parrotts in General Ransom's front, which is the second division to the right of General Williams; he is well in the re-entrant between Atlanta and White Hall, looking up Proctor's Creek. The 4 1/2-inch gun of General Corse has an equally good position. We are in close musket-range of the enemy's main line. That General Kilpatrick may succeeded perfectly and to plenty of damage, it is, of course, important to draw off rom him all the cavalry we can. I wish you to instruct General Garrard minutely; he will obey orders, but if left to himself does not persevere long enough. I think by daylight he ought to be in Decatur, then move some four or five miles in the direction of Flat Rock and skirmish with the enemy, then toward Stone Mountain, and then swinging round toward the Peach Tree road come home, as it were trolling off any party