War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0531 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Atlanta, Ga., August 16, 1864.

Brigadier General J. KILPATRICK,

Commanding Third Cavalry Division:

The general commanding directs that you occupy Sandtown with your command, and scout as far as Camp Creek.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DAVID F. HOW,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant- General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD CAVALRY DIVISION,

Sandtown, Ga., August 16, 1864.

Brigadier- General ELLIOTT,

Chief of Cavalry, Department of the Cumberland:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I have returned to this point and my command has gone into camp. I succeeded in reaching and destroying the depot and public buildings at Fairburn, telegraph wire and railroad track for about three miles. Drove Ross' brigade, of Jackson's division, out of his camp, situated on Camp Creek, about three miles from the railroad, and went into camp late last evening near that point. I marched at an early hour this morning, crossing Camp Creek, and moved to attack Jackson's division, said to be situated on Camp Creek road, near East Point, but I was unable to find any force of the enemy. I scouted the entire country between Camp Creek and the railroad to within one mile and a half of East Point. I was informed that the enemy had here a considerable force of infantry, and a part of Jackson's division cavalry, dismounted and in the trenches. The enemy seemed to make but little or no effort to prevent me from reaching the railroad at any point below East Point Station. I infer from this that the road is to be abandoned. The enemy's cavalry has certainly all been withdrawn from this portion of his line save two brigades, of Jackson's division, which force is not at all formidable. You will see by the accompanying sketch* that if I am abler to maintain the line of pickets indicated, the enemy's lines will be very much contracted and both railroads exposed to raids from this point.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. KILPATRICK,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, August 16, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

General Kilpatrick reports he reached Fairburn, burned the depot, public buildings and stores, tore up three miles of track, and Jackson refused to fight him. At 9 p. m. last night he was this side of Camp Creek, hoping that Jackson would come out. Let your right division know this, and should they observe infantry move out, we must go also.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major- General, Commanding.

---------------

*To appear in the Atlas.

---------------