War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0523 Chapter L.CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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bravery, skill, and, more yet, good sense that influenced him to bear a natural disappointment and do his whole duty like a man. If I could bestow on him substantial reward it would afford me unalloyed satisfaction, but I do believe,in the consciousness of acts done from noble impulses and gracefully admitted by his superiors in authority, he will be contended. He already holds the highest known commission in the army, and it is hard to say how we can better manifest our applause. At the time of General Howard's selection, Major- General Hooker commanded the Twentieth Army Corps in the Army of the Cumberland, made up for his special accommodation out of the old Eleventh and Twelfth Corps, whereby General Slocum was deprived of his corps command. Both the law and practice are and have been to fill vacancies in the higher army commands by selection. Rank or dates of commission have not controlled, nor am I aware that any reflection can be inferred unless the junior be placed immediately over the senior, but in General Howard was not put over him, but in charge of a distinct and separate army. no indignity was offered nor intended, and I must say that General Hooker was not justified in retiring. At all events had he spoken or written to me I would have made every explanation and concession he could have expected, but could not have changed my course, because then, as now, I believe I did right and for the good of our country and cause. As a matter of justice General Slocum, having been displaced by the consolidation, was deemed by General Thomas as entitled to the vacancy created by General Hooker's voluntary withdrawal and has received it.

With great respect,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major- General, Commanding.

SHERMAN'S HEADQUARTERS, August 16, 1864.

General THOMAS:

The operator at Cartersville began a message, saying six regiments were approaching Cartersville. I think all the enemy's cavalry must be up there, and it may be necessary to send ours after it. They may do so much damage to the railroad that it will take a long time to repair it.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major- General.

THOMAS' HEADQUARTERS, August 16, 1864.

Major- General SHERMAN:

Are there not some troops at Cartersville! Do you wish the cavalry sent up to Cartersville

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major- General.

SHERMAN'S HEADQUARTERS, August 16, 1864.

General THOMAS:

There are troops at Allatoona nd the bridge. I have called for a report since John E. Smith went up the road with 2,000 men, made up