War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0509 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

August 15, 1864.

General W. D. WHIPPLE:

GENERAL: General Garrard was with me until 12 or 1 a. m., after receipt of the orders from General Sherman. He got provisions yesterday, but will not have forage until 12 m. to- day. He says he knows the strength of the enemy's cavalry on our left- a brigade or division behind breast- works, and with their horses in rear. That he sends scouts, a company or more, to Decatur, and even below it. The pickets of the enemy and reserves fall back to main line. That Colonel Long, with brigade and two pieces of artillery, went beyond Decatur, and could not draw rebel cavalry from support of their infantry. He thinks that one brigade will obtain as much information as a division. That if the object is to attack the remaining cavalry he should go toward Covington, where it is said they have their broken- down horses. If the object is to break the Macon road, with his knowledge of the country and roads, he would avoid the flank of the enemy near Atlanta and strike the road quickly. He represents the country as affording nothing for man or horse. Would not our trains be in danger if Garrard's entire division should go, with brigade or division of rebel cavalry in front of our left! I told General G [arrard] I would represent the case to General Thomas at an early hour and let him know.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. ELLIOTT,

Brigadier- General, &c.

HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

August 15, 1864.

General GARRARD:

Have presented your statement to General Thomas; he says he cannot give you more definite orders- to use your discretion. I say, if the enemy won't come out and fight you you can't make him, but can drive him to his works. If, in connection with your reconnaissance, you think you cannot strike the railroad, I would not attempt it. Such is my understanding of General Sherman's orders.

W. L. ELLIOTT,

Brigadier- General, Chief of Cavalry.

HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

August 15, 1864.

General GARRARD, or

COMMANDING OFFICER SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

General Stanley's Headquarters:

Five hundred rebel cavalry are reported moving on Vining's Station Send a cavalry force there immediately, without regard to other orders.

W. L. ELLIOTT,

Brigadier General U. S. Vols., Chief of Cav., Dept. of the Cumberland.