War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0464 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, August 11, 1864.

(Received 3.30 p.m.)

General SCHOFIELD:

General Stanley informs me that officers and men of General Stoneman's command, just in, report at Covington all the enemy's cavalry assembling for a grand raid to Tennessee and Kentucky. If this be so the cavalry cannot be on your flank, nor is it possible for the enemy to follow General Hascall with infantry unless they let go their parapets, in which event you should be prepared to let go too. This is all I mean, to have one or two divisions on that flank ready, in case General Hascall becomes heavily engaged, to march in such a direction, not to his rear, but to his front, to relieve him of pressure. We all know that the enemy holds us by inferior force, and I may have to let go our parapets altogether, for it seems we are more besieged than they. Send General Hascall to feel for that road in the morning, and have all your command, if necessary, ready to let go their parapets and engaged the enemy, and if that be no sufficient I will order General Howard to do the same.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Near Atlanta, Ga., August 11, 1864-3.45 p.m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I have the evidence of two days' fighting that the force of the enemy's cavalry on my flank is considerable, certainly enough to surround an infantry division, but this is by no means a serious matter. It occurs to me that if the enemy send infantry to meet Hascall he will not take them from my front, leaving me free to follow them up, but will bring them from other parts of his line little more distant, measured on his interior lines, but much more so on ours. I wish, however, simply to understand fully what you wish me to do, and I will do it as well as I know how. Do you desire Hascall to remain in any advanced position or simply to break the road and return? How much work ought he to do, or how long should he continue his work, or must this be determined hereafter? Is the object simply a reconnaissance, or an extensive destruction of the road, or to draw the enemy out of his works, or all of them? I want to give Hascall full instructions as possible before he starts.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Near Atlanta, Ga., August 11, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

The news from Mobile is very encouraging. Will you be able to break the enemy's line from the hill which Corse has taken? At what time to-day may I look for you here?

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.