War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0450 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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SHERMAN'S HEADQUARTERS, August 10, 1864.

(Received 7.50 a.m.)

General SCHOFIELD:

I will go to Thomas' front to-day to watch the effect of the new battery of 30-pounder Parrotts. I want you to go on perfecting your line and flank, and study as far as possible the roads and lay of the country. Be sue that you advanced line of pickets is close up to the enemy, to be sure, they occupy their main line with something more than a more thin line of vedettes.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

SCHOFIELD'S HEADQUARTERS, August 10, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I have been all along Hascall's skirmish line and carefully reconnoitered the enemy's position. My report of last evening was based upon the observation of others, road essentially accurate. The enemy's lien from a point in front of Cox's right runs substantially as I described it, viz, southeast or south-southeast. This line is an ordinary infantry parapet, recently constructed,and contains one battery about half a mile from Cox's right. The line is visible for a mile or more. There are no works visible southwest of the creek in front of Hascall,and there appears to be no force there but cavalry. It is evident the enemy is simply prolonging his line in advance of our movement and essentially parallel to the Macon railroad.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, near Atlanta, August 10, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

Your report is received. Do you think General Hascall can reach the West Point railroad from his position without assaulting parapets? Do you think a further prolongation would enable us to reach the Macon road without cutting loose from our base? How are the roads south of Utoy? Do you observe any change in the character of the country? We are now cannonading with 4 1/2-inch rifle bolts, and have 4,000 of them on hand.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO, August 10, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Either our maps or surveys or both are so evidently erroneous that I am very uncertain about the distance from Hascall's present position to the West Point railroad, but I have no doubt he can reach it without assaulting parapets, and by moving nearly in a southeasterly direction from his present position the distance may be a little more than a mile and it may be three miles. I think it probable that another corps on