War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0439 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Near Atlanta, August 9, 1864.

(Received 12 m.)

Brigadier General A. S. WILLIAMS,

Commanding Twentieth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding desires that you will move up the right of your line so as to connect with the left of the Army of the Tennessee.

Very respectfully, yours,

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 9, 1864.

Brigadier General K. GARRARD,

Commanding Second Cavalry Division:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that at as early an hour as possible this morning you send a brigade out to and beyond Decatur on our left to make a demonstration against the enemy. General Kilpatrick's division is ordered to threaten a crossing of the Chattahoochee near Campbellton. The enemy's cavalry manifested unusual activity on our right yesterday, threatening to cross Utoy Creek. This movement of the cavalry is ordered to occupy the attention of the enemy's and prevent him in any way embarrassing the movements of General Schofield to-day while he endeavors to find the rebel left flank.

Yours, very respectfully,

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MARIETTA, August 9, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I arrived here yesterday. Am not in condition to report in person to-day. Small detachments of my brigade are hourly arriving. Will muster them to-day, and will report in person to-morrow unless otherwise ordered.

HORACE CAPRON,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

Statement of W. H. Gates (citizens).

OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 9, 1864.

Left Atlanta on the evening of the 8th instant and came with his wife to Decatur. Saw no pickets on the way who halted him until within three miles of Decatur; saw but few troops on the road, and those he saw were cavalry. Thinks there are no troops east of the cemetery except cavalry pickets. There is a camp of cavalry three miles south of Decatur. The State troops occupy the trenches on the north and northeast side of town, and their front is picketed by Cheatham's troops. The State troops number about 20,000. The whole rebel force is estimated at 60,000. There is one heavy gun located north of the female college. All business in Atlanta is suspended; the goods have been removed to other points in the State. There is but one grocery running in Atlanta and no stores or other business places. Hotels are closed.