War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0423 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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as close to it as we can get. Cox's right rests substantially on the creek. Hascall had to bridge the creek to make his movement to the right. He has a brigade across and on the ridge beyond. It has met a pretty stubborn resistance, but not such as to indicate a large infantry force. The enemy's cavalry is all along Utoy Creek beyond our right, but has made no attempt to cross. The ground is open from Cox's right toward the railroad. The enemy's line does not appear to cross the open ground. What appeared to be the railroad crosses this open ground about a mile from Cox's right. I will try to learn all about it before dark. Hascal can't do much more to-day.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO, Near Atlanta, August 8, 1864-8.30 p.m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Hascall only succeeded in getting one brigade across the creek and intrenched. The enemy is pretty strong in front of that brigade, and has used artillery freely. Hascall is making good roads and bridges across the creek. It seems clear that we are as near to the railroad as we can get on this side of the creek without breaking the rebel lines. To cross the creek take as around below East Point. Whether one division is sufficient force to make that move with, seems extremely doubtful. Possibly the demonstration may be sufficient to make Hood let go of Atlanta. I am satisfied Cox's right is not more than a mile from East Point.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, near Atlanta, August 8, 1864.

(Received 9.40 p.m.)

General SCHOFIELD:

I have your dispatch. Continue to press by the right. It is impossible for the enemy to extend much farther. Thomas and Howard will continue to press forward. If Garrard watches well the passes of Utoy Creek, I have no fears of that flank. If Cox has a view of the railroad over clear ground to his right, distant only a mile, our rifle guns will reach it. Still, Hascall should move straight toward it, and intrench as close as he can get. I think that open ground is below East Point, and the railroad you see is the West Point road,which the enemy does not use. East Point is at the head of the south fork of Utoy. I have your dispatch of 8.30. See in person to the point occupied by Hascall. Let good bridges and roads be prepared,and intrench the point as a flank to threaten below East Point. Strengthen the main line as much as possible, so that, if the enemy will fight of that flank, you will have as much force as possible to support, but explain to Hascall if they allow him to intrench they will not attack him, but feign, for the purpose of breaking out somewhere else.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.