War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0399 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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terday the enemy's flank, but found intrenchments of ordinary strength with extensive entanglements in front. Reilly assaulted gallantly and energetically, and I believe with more than ordinary confidence of success on the part of himself and men. But the obstructions were so great that it was found impossible to reach the parapet. Reilly's loss is about 500 men, including many valuable officers. After this failure, I made a much larger circuit to the right for the purpose of reaching the enemy's flank or a point of his line not protected by abatis. I struck the point where the Sandtown road crosses the main Utoy Creek. Here the enemy's line makes a sharp salient, bending back along the north bank of the creek. The main line was prolonged by cavalry, with artillery, toward the Chattahoochee. General Hascall sent two brigades, under General Cooper, to clear this flank, which he did by crossing the creek, but too late for any further operations. We are intrenching the ground we have gained, and will be ready for work again in the morning. The losses in Cox's and Hascall's divisions are probably not more than 1,000 men. I have not thought it advisable to put in more men than the Twenty-third Corps to-day, except in making demonstrations to draw the enemy from the points of attack. General Johnson has been with me during the day and has promptly executed all my orders. Colonel Warner, who left me late this evening, can explain to you more fully our situation. If you take the blue colored map of Atlanta and vicinity, the forks of the Utoy Creek southeast of the town of Utoy is, I believe, Hascall's position. I will determine more accurately to-night.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, August 6, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

I have your dispatch. There is no alternative but for you to continue to work on that flank with as much caution as possible, and it is possible the enemy may attack us, or draw out. He must defend that road.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Near Atlanta, Ga., August 6, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

We are working hard for the big road. The ground is very rough. I am confident of getting the road, but doubt my ability to either reach the enemy's left or break his lines, but will give it a fair trial.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

August 6, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

The rough measurements we have been able to make to-day place me much farther south and east than I had supposed. Contracting them