War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0393 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, August 6, 1864.

General THOMAS:

Your dispatch is received. Your instructions to General Stanley are exactly right. Only hold fast that left flank as long as possible, because I think the enemy may be repairing the Augusta road and it is important we control it from our left flank. General Stanley should fight for it hard, and I don't believe the enemy will venture an attack as long as they know we are working on the other flank. General Schofield is making slow but sure progress.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Near Atlanta, Ga., August 6, 1864.

Major-General THOMAS:

General Schofield reports at 12.30 that he had crossed the main road, the Sandtown, and found the enemy's line. He had attacked but did not succeed, but will repeat it again farther to the right. Order your batteries to be demonstrative and engage the enemy's at all points along your line during the day. We cannot hear the sound of his musketry.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

(Same to General Howard.)

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

August 6, 1864--2 p. m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

General Palmer has decided to go, and I have relieved him from the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. I respectfully recommend Brigadier General J. C. Davis as major-general U. S. Volunteers, and request that he be assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Corps. Should there be any objection to General Davis I respectfully recommend the promotion of Brigadier General J. M. Brannan, with the request that he be assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Corps.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, August 6, 1864.

General THOMAS:

General Schofield has been at work to-day with his two divisions, and holds General Johnson in support. He has just finished working up his measurements and locates himself at the forks of the Utoy Creek, two miles west of East Point. Though our line is extended, we cannot do better than to control and strengthen by defenses our present front, and let General Schofield work so as to threaten East Point. I do not believe the enemy can defend so long a line, and he may be forced to choose between the two, Atlanta and East Point. Un-