War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0385 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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manner already admitted responsible for the unsatisfactory results on this flank, but upon the principle that as you are responsible to the country for this campaign every subordinate officer employed ought upon the first intimation from you of a want of confidence step out of the way promptly and feel that he is serving the country in doing so. Pardon this long letter. I will call upon you to-morrow morning and present a formal application to be relieved.

Respectfully,

JOHN M. PALMER,

Major-General.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS,

Utoy Creek, August 5, 1864--7.20 a. m.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Commanding Army of the Ohio:

SIR: Colonel Walker, commanding brigade in General Baird's division, gives me the following, as obtained from rebel deserters and prisoners, who appeared candid: "The rebel line has a large re-entrant angle along Generals Hascall's and Baird's fronts; in then refuses, but follows near the creek and the Sandtown road all the way to the river. For about a mile to Hascall's right the trenches are held by infantry, beyond that by cavalry. Immediately in this front they report the lines very strong, having, as they say, three lines of intrenchments and with at least twenty pieces of artillery within half a mile. They seemed positive that the trenches were continued to the river or near it, though inferior in strength, as soon as they pass the infantry line." The enemy made a little brush at Baird's skirmish line this morning, but it amounted to nothing. General Hascall says he saw General Baird a few minutes ago, and that General Baird says he is without orders this morning.

Very respectfully, &c.,

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

In the Field, Ga., August 5, 1864--10.45 a. m.

Brigadier General J. D. COX,

Commanding Third Division, Twenty-third Army Corps:

GENERAL: Baird and Morgan are developing their lines along those of the enemy and expect to be in position and intrenched by 1 o'clock. Johnson is then to make a rapid detour to the right and endeavor to strike the enemy's flank or a point where his line is weak. You will move toward the right so as to take Johnson's place as reserve and at the same time make an assault if you find any point near the right where success seems probable. If Johnson succeeds your assault will probably not be necessary. If he fail, his effort will probably draw off some troops and thus increase your chances. I am willing you should be rather rash than prudent in this case. Johnson is to start promptly at 2 o'clock. Look out for an attack from the enemy on your right.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General, Commanding.

25 R R--VOL XXXVIII, PT V