War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0340 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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oners and incumbrances to save his command. He crossed the Chattahoochee below franklin and up by Dallas to Marietta. The plan was for him to meet General Stoneman at Lovejoy's, but he did not meet him. Prisoners report that Yankee cavalry were shelling Macon on the 1st instant, so I think General Stoneman has a chance of rescuing those prisoners. It was a bold and rash adventure, but I sanctioned it, and hoped for its success from its very rashness. I think that all Georgia is now in my front, and he may meet but little opposition and succeed in releasing those prisoners. The difficulty will then commence for them to reach me. My lines are very strong, and cover well all our brigades across Chattahoochee. I will use my cavalry hereafter to cover the railroad, and use infantry and artillery against Atlanta. A large part of Hood's army is militia, that cannot be trusted in the open field, and I think we have crippled the three fighting corps now commanded by Stewart, Stephen D. Lee, and Hardee. It is even whispered that Hardee has resigned; but this is as yet but the story of deserters.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

NEAR ATLANTA, GA., August 3, 1864-11.30 p. m.

(Received 11 p.m. 4th.)

Major General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.:

In order to make my campaign collusive I should have a large cavalry force. We find great difficulty in procuring horses. I understand there are 2,000 at Saint Louis. can I not have them? Recruits also should be sent to Nashville, and sent forward daily, and distributed as they come.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., August 3, 1864.

General WEBSTER,

Nashville:

General McCook is safe. He is in with 1,200 of his command. About 500 had got into Marietta before him. Still I will need cavalry.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

NASHVILLE, August 3, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Lewis Merrill, chief of Cavalry Bureau at Saint Louis, telegraphs me he has 2,000 cavalry horses on hand, and will send them to me if they will allow it at Washington. This reply to a telegram from me. They might give you 1,000 of these animals if you request it, if not all. They will deny me. I have asked too often.

J. L. DONALDSON,

Senior and Supervising Quartermaster.