War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0334 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Before Atlanta, Ga., August 2,!864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

From all that I can se, I judge that the enemy's infantry line bends back opposite my left center and runs from that point nearly south behind a small branch of the creek in front of Howard and myself. The force in front of my right appears to be cavalry. To seriously threaten the enemy's flank and railroad communication it will be necessary to cross the creek in front of my right and reach the Sandtown road, which is about a mile beyond the creek. If this move can be made with a sufficiently large force the result must be very decisive. Please inform me if you desire me to push forward to-morrow, and also whether Morgan's and Ward's division will be absolutely under my command, or only to be called upon when the necessity arises. At present they are in easy supporting distance, but if I move they should move with me.

Respectfully,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., August 2, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

I would like to have you to prepare a crossing-place over the Utoy.

General Davis' division will remain to-morrow, and during the day, if all is quiet, Ward's will return to occupy the line now held by Palmer's corps, and all of Palmer's corps will come to Davis' and advance with yours, or even beyond you, as an attacking column. I will be over tomorrow.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., August 2, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

Will you have your command in position and intrenched by morning? How far do you reckon you are off from the railroad?

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Before Atlanta, Ga., August 2, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

My troops are in position, and will be well intrenched to-night. I have prolonged Howard's new line along the branch of Utoy Creek about a mile and a half, and have a good flank. I think no point of my line is nearer the railroad than Howard's right, which I estimate to be between one mile and a quarter and one mile and three-quarters. My right is not as far forward as I hoped it would be, but I have gone as far as it was possible to-day. To cross the creek will be a day's works, and I reckon