War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0312 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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Head now; had a small fight first day; since, nothing. I think I understood the man, and that General Stoneman has gone on to Macon and Anderson [ville]; a desperate move, but may succeed for its a desperation.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

July 31, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I had started Colonel Garrard to aid General McCook in recrossing the river. I will order him back now that I know McCook is going the other way.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

In the Field, Ga., July 31, 1864.

Colonel ISRAEL GARRARD,

Commanding Seventh Ohio Cavalry:

COLONEL: In compliance with orders from Major-General Sherman, you will move with your regiment across the Chattahoochee at or near the railroad bridge; thence down the west bank of the river to a point (understood to be near Campbellton) where McCook left his pontoon bridge after crossing the river on his present raid. the object of your expedition is to aid General McCook in recrossing the river on his return. It is understood that General McCook left a regiment of cavalry with his bridge for the above purpose. If you find this to be the case, you will join that regiment and act in cantered with it in carrying out General McCook's instructions. In any event, you will watch carefully for General McCook's troops for some distance up and down the river, endeavor to given early information of their return, and learn at what point they propose to cross, so as, if practicable, to have the bridge laid by the time his troops reach the river. You will use your utmost endeavors to assist General McCook's troops in a safe passage of the river. Having completed this duty, you will report for further instructions at these headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, CAV. COMMAND, DEPT. OF THE OHIO,

Sunday, July 31, 1864.

Major J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Ohio:

I have the honor to report that the most through and careful investigation of all the news and reports among the citizens of Decatur has satisfied me that there was a fight of no great importance with the rear of Stoneman's column near Flast Rock, but further than that I do not consider the reports to be entirely reliable. they are all founded on