War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0304 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

July 30, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I have your dispatch expressing your desire that I advance my picket-line in front of the distillery near the road leading to Atlanta. I tried that on the 28th and found it impracticable, for this reason, viz, the point refereed to is in a large re-reentering angle of the enemy's works, and the enemy's picket-line in that vicinity is enfilade by the artillery of both the adjacent salient. Neither the enemy's picket-line, nor even the main captain in rear, should be held by our troops until those salient are carried. One of them is three-quarters of a mile to my left, and hence beyond my reach. The other is somewhat to my right. I will see General Stanley and ascertain what can be done about this latter salient. Perhaps we can drive in the skirmishers around it and keep down its fire with our sharpshooters.

Respectfully,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., July 30, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

Order Colonel Garrard to feel into Decatur again in the morning, and, without seeming anxious, to pick up any further news of our cavalry. Where did General Garrard leave his wagons and lame horses?

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Before Atlanta, Ga., July 30, 1864.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN:

I do not know where General Garrard left his wagons and horses.

They were not reported to my quartermaster.

J. M. ACHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Before Atlanta, Ga., July 30, 1864.

Colonel ISRAEL GARRARD,

Commanding Seventh Ohio Cavalry:

COLONEL: The commanding general desires you to feel into Decatur with your regiment to-morrow morning, and, if possible, pick up some information about the movements of our cavalry. Do not appear to be anxious to obtain the information or intimate that we are not already informed of all the movements of Generals Stoneman and Garrard, but find out from the citizens or others where the cavalry is and what it has accomplished. Please report the result of your inquiries as soon as you have procured any reliable information.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. CAMPBELL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.