War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0250 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

Search Civil War Official Records

have been moving all night to their left (our right), in such manner as induces him to believe that they are moving away. He wishes your pickets to be vigilant, and in case the enemy leave your front to follow as closely and as far as you can with comparatively safety.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. PERKINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

In the Field, July 25, 1864.

Brigadier General W. L. ELLIOTT,

Chief of Cavalry, Department of the Cumberland:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that McCook's cavalry be ordered out as far as the Turner's Ferry road, and to cover that ferry, that a pontoon bridge may be laid at that place, and McCook and Harrison put in communication. Let this be done early to-morrow morning.

Yours, very respectfully,

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., July 25, 1864.

General McCOOK,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

GENERAL: I understood General Thomas to say yesterday that you had possession of Turner's Ferry road out for three miles from the river, and had ordered a pontoon bridge down that you would be in connection with Colonel Harrison's command on the other side of the river. I wish that bridge laid down, and you to establish communication with Colonel Harrison to-morrow. Captain Poe will see that the bridge is put down, and one of my inspectors will inspect Colonel Harrison's command to-morrow. Cover the bridge with all your cavalry.

I am, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

July 25, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN,

Commanding Army:

GENERAL: Last night the rest of my command arrived, bringing about 30 prisoners and some hundred negroes. The depot at Social Circle and a large amount of supplies, including a lot of new Government wagons were burned. It will take three or four days to put my command in order. My wagons are not up, and I do not know where they are. I have also over 1,000 horses unshod. I can to all duty required of me on this flank, but, if possible, would like it to be so arranged as not to send me off again for some days. General Sherman spoke to me last night, before I had time to know fully my condition, about some expedition. I could only reply that I would try to carry out all orders, but could not at that time pass my judgment in regard to its probable success or the strength I could bring to bear. If the route is taken