War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0239 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Atlanta, Ga., July 23, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel WILLIAM T. CLARK,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Sergeant Childs, Fourteenth Ohio Battery, came through to-day from Marietta, passing through Roswell at 2 p. m. All our trains were there with light guard. On the direct road to Decatur he passed one wagon belonging to the Seventeenth Corps, loaded with grain, burning. He came through Decatur; saw no rebels, but heard of them off the road.

It appears to me that our trains are in great danger. They had not received any orders and did not know what to do.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General, Commanding.

JULY 23, 1864.

Colonel CAPRON, Commanding Cavalry Brigade:

Bring your command to the cross-roads, leaving a pretty strong picket guard (say 150 or 200 men) at the bridge, and send a staff officer to report to me the arrival of your command. The enemy is very active at Turner's Ferry.

Very respectfully, &c.,

STONEMAN,

General, Commanding.

CAMP NEAR MILES NORTH OF ATLANTA,

July 23, 1864-11 p. m.

Major T. T. ECKERT:

Enemy has been less active to-day, attacking only in front of Army of the Cumberland, and being engaged in burying dead on ground of yesterday's fight under flags of truce. General Logan commands Army of the Tennessee, and Morgan L. Smith takes the Fifteenth Corps. Our loss in yesterday's battle-of artillery, 8 guns; about 30 wagons, and 200 prisoners. As I write our heavy artillery is at work, and large fires are burning in Atlanta, supposed to be the enemy destroying stores preparatory to evacuating.

J. C. VAN DUZER,

Cipher Operator, U. S. Military Telegraph.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

BEFORE ATLANTA, GA., Numbers 76.

July 23, 1864.

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VII. Brigadier General M. L. Smith, commanding Fifteenth Army Corps, will direct General Woods, commanding First Division of his corps, to move into Decatur at 5 o'clock to-morrow morning, leaving along his works a heavy line of the skirmishers. After remaining a while in Decatur he will return and occupy his position. General Smith will also direct details of men from General Woods' division and the prisoners from his command to commence at the extreme front of the line destroy effectually the railroad to and including Decatur, the ties to be taken up, the rails placed upon from and bent and twisted while during, so as to prevent any further use of the road. All details of soldiers will be sent