War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0226 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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the prolongation of the roads upon which you marched toward the town. General Sherman wishes you to pass word along the lines to your right, to Wood, Newton, Hooker, Thomas, &c., that you and the forces to your left will fire, and explain to them the cause of it.

By order of Major-General Howard:

J. S. FULLERTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864-5.40 p. m.

Major-General STANLEY,

Commanding First Division:

The enemy's cavalry has passed around McPherson's left, and in accordance with instructions received from department headquarters the general commanding directs that you send two regiments from your division to guard the bridge you built over Peach Tree Creek.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. S. FULLERTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864-8 p. m.

General WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Lieutenant-Colonel Fullerton during my absence had directed General Stanley to send two regimens to the crossing of Peach Tree Creek by the Decatur road; but General Stanley having deployed his entire force, taking a portion of General Schofield's line, I countermanded the order. I have sent a picket force from each division to the rear, one to Newton's bridge across Peach Tree Creek, on to the Decatur road, and one to an intermediate point. Since our forces have reoccupied Decatur I presume the necessity for sending the regiments to intercept the rebel cavalry is obviated, and will not send them unless the general commanding thinks best.

Respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864-8 p. m.

Brigadier-General WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that the enemy evacuated his works in my front between 3 and 4 o'clock this morning. Generals Stanley and Wood followed him as soon as it was light, and General Newton soon afterward. They advanced near the enemy's new line of works around Atlanta, and after some skirmishing went into line of battle about two miles from the city. The main line has not been much