War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0210 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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CAMP ON PEACH TREE CREEK, GA.,

July 20, 1864-10 p. m.

(Via Vinning's Station. Received 11 a. m. 21st.)

Major THOMAS T. ECKERT, Washington:

Our left has pushed forward to-day to within two miles of Atlanta. Reports that the right has remained nearly in position of last night, thus developing the enemy's line and proving that our information was very nearly correct as regarded it. Enemy has assaulted several times to-day, and has been severely repulsed each time. Our casualties light, and everything favorable.

J. C. VAN DUZER.

SPECIAL

HDQRS. DEPT. AND ARMY OF THE TENN., FIELD ORDERS,

In Field, three and a half miles from Atlanta. Numbers 73.

July 20, 1864.

I. In accordance with directions of Major-General Sherman, Brigadier-General Garrard, commanding cavalry division, will destroy McAfee's Bridge across the Chattahoochee River. General Garrard will cover the Roswell depot and protect the trains of this army.

II. Corps commanders will cause their several positions to be intrenched to-night, and will have their commands in line of battle at 3.30 to-morrow morning, ready to repel any attacks of the enemy.

* * *

IV. Brigadier General G. A. Smith. U. S. Volunteers, is hereby relieved from the command of the First Brigade, Second Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, and will forthwith report to Major General F. P. Blair for assignment to command of the Fourth Division, Seventeenth Army Corps.

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By order of Major General James B. McPherson:

WM. T. CLARK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NEAR ATLANTA, July 21, 1864.

(Received 1 p. m. 22d.)

His Excellency President LINCOLN:

Your dispatch is received. I have the highest veneration for the law, and will respect it always, however it conflicts with my opinion of its propriety. I only telegraphed to General Halleck because I had seen no copy of the law, and supposed the War Department might have some control over its operations. When I have taken Atlanta and can sit down in some peace I will convey by letter a fuller expression of my views in relation to the subject.

With great respect,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 21, 1864-10 a.m.

(Received 6 p. m.)

Major General W. T. SHERMAN:

The Richmond Whig of the 20th learns from the Macon Confederate that but little quartermaster or commissary stores remain in At-