War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0206 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS,

July 20, 1864.

Major J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: Colonel Byrd's brigade has reported since I wrote my last note, and is now closed up on the column.

Very respectfully, &c.,

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

JULY 20, 1864-10 a. m.

Major-General THOMAS,

Commanding, &c.:

I have the honor through yourself to state for the information of the commanding general that nothing of importance transpired in this vicinity during the night, except be that a column of cavalry of the enemy passed down on the other side of the river, reported by the officer on duty at Howell's Ferry as three miles long. I have sent a scout down to Campbellton to try to ascertain who they are, and where they have gone to. Please let one of your staff give me the state of things with you and on the left of the army. It may give me a clue to some to of the various reports and rumors I hear, one of which is that a portion of Johnston's army is south of Atlanta, which of course is hardly possible. The force that passed down last night may be on the way to West Point, drawn there by Rousseau.

Very respectfully, &c.,

GEORGE STONEMAN,

Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND,

July 21, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded to Major-General Sherman, commanding Military Division of the Mississippi, for his information.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864.

Major General GEORGE STONEMAN,

Commanding Cavalry Force:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your note of 10 a. m. this day, and to give you a summary of events occurring in this army. Our lines were yesterday pushed across Peach Tree Creek in several places, and to-day when an advance was being made by all the corps, the enemy made a furious attack on our men, commencing at about 4 p. m. on the extreme left, General Newton's lines, and extending to the extreme right. This attack was continued until night set in, and was most handsomely repulsed at all points. Our loss on some parts of the line is reported severe, but no official report has yet been made. The impression of