War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0172 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

In the Field, near Pace's Ferry, Ga., July 18, 1864.

Major General J. M. PALMER,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that at daylight to-morrow morning you send a division upon the main road leading from your front to Atlanta. Keep the head of the column covered by a strong line of skirmishes, press the enemy strongly, and be prepared to re-enforce the division should it become necessary. Major-Generals Hooked and Howard will also be instructed to send each a division in the same direction at the same time from their fronts respectively.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff.

(Similar to Generals Howard and Hooker.)

P. S.-Brigadier-General Johnson's communication forwarded by you just received. The major-general commanding directs that you cross Peach Tree Creek if you can do it with one division, and push the enemy along as far as you can.

W. D. W.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, FOURTEENTH CORPS,

July 18, 1864.

Captain A. A. McCLURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourteenth Corps:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report, for the information of the major-general commanding, that my skirmishers are more than one-half of the line on Peach Tree Creek. From near the right of Colonel McCook's line (which is the left brigade) the line is slightly refused, but within a few yards of the creek and commanding it at all points. At Howell's Mill there seems to be a small force of skirmishers; they fire pretty sharply at McCook's men. The brigade is destroyed; creek deep with very abrupt and high banks; cannot be crossed so far as is reported, except by bringing. No infantry has been developed as yet through the miller at Howell's Mill says they have infantry on the opposite bank of the creek. The ridge on the other side is not very high, nor apparently very difficult of ascent, in front of Moore's line; in some places open field; in front of McCook's heavy woods. Some of Moore's skirmishers report works. Slight skirmishing is going on all alone the line. My men are intrenching on the skirmish line and my main line is being made very strong. There is an interval between my line and that of General Hooker. I have a regiment on the Buck Head road, between the two as an outpost.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. W. JOHNSON,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, July 18, 1864-8.30 p. m.

This papers received this moment, and respectfully forwarded as having probably an important influence upon the plans of the general commanding for to-morrow.