War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0154 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Vining's Station, Ga., July 16, 1864.

Brigadier General E. M. McCook,

Commanding First Cavalry Division:

The general commanding directs me to inform you that the Fourteenth Army Corps is moving and will probably cross the river to-day. You will move with your command to the position pointed out to you and patrol the river as designated.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DAVID F. HOW,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

DECATUR, July 16, 1864.

Brigadier-General WHIPPLE:

The force reported at Guntersville proved to be a detachment of Rousseau's command as telegraphed this morning by Colonel Lyon, from Claysville.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, on the Chattahoochee, July 16, 1864.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Commanding Army of the Ohio:

GENERAL: I have just heard from General McPherson. He moves in the morning for his position on a Decatur road till abreast of you, his cavalry at or near Buchanan's. You will therefore move to-morrow to the position described in Special Field Orders, Numbers 35, which will be at the camp-ground you described to me to-day, with an advance down to Nancy's Creek. This will divert, too, much engaged in crossing at Pace's. General Garrard has been to Cross Keys and finds nothing on the road but bands of cavalry.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee River, July 16, 1864.

General McPHERSON, Roswell:

General R. S. Granger, from Decatur, reports that a force of the enemy's cavalry, 2,800 strong, has crossed the Tennessee north of Claysville. I cannot imagine what force that can be, unless sent from Johnston's left flank, say some of W. H. Jackson's cavalry. As General Stoneman found heavy cavalry all along the Chattahoochee as far as he went, say twenty-five miles below Campbellton, it is quite probable some of Wheeler's force has been shifted to Johnston's left, in which case the cavalry force will be light in your front. I hope to start General Blair so as to reach you early to-morrow, and that he will be near enough for you to-morrow to get out as far as Buchanan's. I am about moving camp.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.