War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0148 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Chattahoochee River, July 15, 1864.

Brigadier-General LEGGETT,

Commanding Third Division, Seventeenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: Inclosed please find orders for the movement of this command to-morrow morning. As a portion of your command is so distant the entire corps will encamp just beyond the Nickajack, at the point where General Force crossed the first day of our arrival in this vicinity. A note from General Sherman says that General Stoneman is at Sweet Water Creek to-night and will commence relieving you early to-morrow morning. It is desirable that you leave your pickets on until relieved by Stoneman, in order to mask this movement as long as possible from the enemy. The bulk of your force can move out at any time you may select; the pickets being unencumbered can rapidly join them after being relieved. All necessary arrangements have been made to provide the men with rations at their camp to-morrow night. The general desires you to give the men the advantage of the cooler portions of the day as much as possible.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. J. ALEXANDER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.- Upon further reflection the general thinks you had better withdraw all your pickets up to Sandtown, leave a strong picket there, withdraw all from that point up to Howell's, and picket from there to Gresham's left until the remainder of your command is concentrated, when they will all be withdrawn.

Respectfully, &c.,

A. J. ALEXANDER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

July 15, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Granger reports about 2,800 of the enemy's cavalry across the Tennessee, near Claysville. I have telegraphed him he has force enough, and I shall expect him to whip any force the enemy can now get across the Tennessee.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

In the Field, July 15, 1864.

Brigadier-General GRANGER,

Decatur, Ala.:

Your dispatches received. The major-general commanding says you have force enough to whip any force which may cross the river, and he expects you will do it; and after you have driven them off arrest all sympathizers with the rebellion in your district and send them to Brigadier-General Webster, at Nashville, to be banished from the United States.

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.