War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0144 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

Search Civil War Official Records

expectation of driving us out, and then unite against Sherman. They will fail if they attempt this programme. My greatest fear is of their sending troops to Johnston first. Sherman ought to be notified of the possibility of a corps going from here, and should be prepared to take up a good defensive position in case one is sent - one which he could hold against such increase. If Hunter cannot get to Gordonsville and Charlottesville to cut the railroad, he would make all the valley south of the Baltimore and Ohio road a desert as high up as possible. I do not mean that houses should be burned, but all provisions and stock should be removed, and the people notified to move out.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee River, July 15, 1864.

General THOMAS:

A man came in last night from Columbus, Ga., with provost-marshal's pass of July 4, who had escaped from Anderson[ville], and was one who was captured the time I went to Meridian. He gives but little news, and says the guard at Columbus and West Point are not over 500 each. Heard nothing from Mobile or Montgomery on his way up. A scout in from Atlanta with dates to 3 p. m. 13th says Bragg and staff had arrived, and Kirby Smith, with 20,000, was expected from Meridian. All bosh of course. All newspapers have quit Atlanta except the Memphis Appeal. That, I suppose, is tired of moving, and wants to be let alone.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee River, July 15, 1864.

General THOMAS:

I have a letter from Major-General Stoneman, dated 13th, at Moore's Bridge, on the Chattahoochee. He had captured the scouts and drove off the bridge guard before he could burn it. This bridge is twenty-five miles below Campbellton, on the road from Carrollton to Newnan. General Stoneman said, at daylight next morning, viz, yesterday, he could make a demonstration on the railroad ten miles out. He captured a courier to the bridge guard, saying that a Yankee force was coming, but the bridge must be held at all hazards till the re-enforcements arrived.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee River, July 15, 1864.

General THOMAS:

I have heard from General Stoneman. He attempted to cross at Moore's Bridge, but encountered too much artillery, and thought it imprudent to attempt, lest he might not get back. He is now near