War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0140 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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far as the railroad he may encounter most of Wheeler's cavalry, but I have no doubt most of Johnston's cavalry is gone to the south toward West Point, drawn there by Generals Stoneman and Rousseau. A dash at the road would develop the truth, but to be certain, the infantry should be out as far as the head of Nancy's Creek. I hope to hear of General Stoneman to-night.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near [Roswell] Bridge, July 14, 1864.

Major General JOHN A. LOGAN,

Commanding Fifteenth Corps:

GENERAL: You will move your command across the Chattahoochee ont he bridge just finished by Major-General Dodge's command and take up a position on the Roswell and Atlanta road in the vicinity of a man's house named Beaver, about two miles from the river. Captain Reese, of the Engineers, will indicate the position.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 14, 1864.

Brigadier-General LEGGETT,

Commanding Third Division, Seventeenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: General Sherman is very anxious to know at the very earliest moment of the return of Major-General Stoneman. The general therefore requests that you will direct the commanding officer of the troops on your extreme right, if possible, to communicate this to the commanding officers of the cavalry on your right with the request that they send an express to you, which please forward to these headquarters.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. J. ALEXANDER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee River, July 14, 1864.

Commanding Officer of the Troops ordered from Allatoona to Kenesaw:

The position at Kenesaw is selected on account of its peculiar strength. The main part of your force should be held at some good camp near its base, with a strong picket and lookout on the eastern hill and the one known as Brushy Hill, occupied by General Leggett, during our operations before Marietta. The point known as the tan-yards, or it may be the water station, appeared to me the best point for your camp. the chief object is to guard the railroad as far down as Marietta and to protect our stores in Marietta. There are three regiments in Marietta to load and unload cars and to guard the place, and, should the depot become threatened, you will make the proper disposition to cover it. I don't want troops gartered in a town because the universal experience is that they lose in discipline and efficiency. Keep your regiments in good camps, with regular guard mountings and evening