War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0134 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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ROSWELL, July 13, 1864-3.30 p. m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Telegraph is finished here. Scouting parties went five miles south on Buck Head road. Found no enemy. Enemy is strong on Decatur road near Vance's Creek, and also on road one mile south of McAfee's Bridge. All quiet and everything progressing satisfactorily. Bridge will be finished to-day.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee River, July 13, 1864.

General DODGE,

Roswell:

General McPherson left here about 10 a. m. for Marietta and Roswell. Report to me this evening his arrival and that of the Fifteenth Corps. All very quiet here.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

ROSWELL, July 13, 1864-9 p. m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Advance of Fifteenth Army Corps is camped near Roswell. General McPherson has not arrived. Men who left Atlanta yesterday, employees in Government shops, say all machinery, stores, &c., have been packed up and are being sent to Augusta. They came by way of Decatur. Report no force of enemy in that direction, or works. They think most of infantry is west of railroad. They saw no works after leaving Atlanta. Bridge is built; is double track.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Chattahoochee River, July 13, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi:

GENERAL: In obedience to your order conveyed in the indorsement on General Stoneman's communication, I have directed General Leggett to picket the mouth of the Sweet Water Creek. General Leggett pickets now from the mouth of Nickajack Creek to the mouth of Sweet Water Creek, and General Gresham pickets from the mouth of Nickajack to General Hooker's right, a distance of about three miles, making a total distance picketed by this corps of about ten miles. This leaves me a reserve of only two regiments belonging to the Fourth Division, General Gresham's, and which will be placed in the most available position to act as a reserve.

The enemy have at various points along the river small boats in which parties can be conveyed across at night, making it necessary to have heavier pickets than would otherwise be required, which accounts for the fact the reserve is so small.